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Analysis tenascin-C for suppression of Human Brain Tumor with Interference RNA

Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) accounts for approximately 12-15% of intracranial neoplasms. The GBM remains refractory to therapy because of tumor heterogenity, local invasion, and non-uniform vascular permeability to drugs. Patients with GBM have the median survival of approximately 8-10 months, and for those cases where tumor recurs, the average time of tumor progression after therapy is only eight weeks. A combination of different treatment modes as surgery and chemo- or/and radiotherapy extend survival only for a short time, if any. Recently, tenascin-C (TN-C) as a dominant epitope in glioblastoma has been discovered. Tenascin-C is a multidomain large extracellular matrix glycoprotein composed of six monomers. The size of tenascin-C monomers (180-250kDa) varies as a result of an alternative splicing of the fibronectin repeats at the pre-mRNA level. For the first time we applied bioinformatic and molecular modeling procedures, for detailed analysis of the organization of tenascin-C and we performed bioinformatic analysis of tenascin-C gene. We showed the higher level of tenascin-C in the human tumor tissues: brain, intestine and breast. These results suggested a new role of tenascin-C as the potential tumor marker and drug target.
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International Supercomputing Conference, Dresden, Germany

ISC has evolved into a high-powered international conference and exhibition that gives its attendees a global perspective on the cutting edge of HPC. As always, our conference program tackles hot HPC topics; this year, for example, we will have a panel session on “Green Computing”, a topic that was almost unknown just two years ago. ISC’s focus on future trends and developments can also be seen in this year’s keynote presentation by Prof. Dr. Satoshi Matsuoka of the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, who will discuss “Everybody Supercomputes in the Next Generation Cyber-Science Infrastructure”.
I look forward to seeing you in Dresden.